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Give Up Boring Cuts

March 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

I grew up with a hairstylist whom my family was very devout to and also served as a second mom to me. I have never gotten a haircut from anyone other than my long-time stylist. I have mastered exactly how she works toward cutting hair and the exact tools she uses in the process. I have seen her in action so many times that sometimes I swear I could be her. But recently, I watched a friend perform a cut on a client and realized there are so many more tools available for stylists. It was like I came out of my sheltered styling life that I was living.

Although I’m not a hairstylist myself, Jeanette (my hairdresser) has always told me the exact tools that she uses on my hair and all the things I need to know about her process of styling. Since I have grown up watching her give cuts, I haven’t known there to be any other way to cut someone’s hair. It was amazing to me to see how much there is to offer in the world of hair salons and styling besides just hair scissors and hairspray.

My friend began her process with a fresh wash. She then moved over to her cutting station where she began her actual haircut with the professional shears. The shears she used were very high-profile and glided right through the client’s hair. This part of the process is the only part I’ve ever seen take place. The next part was the big surprise for me; my friend got out her “texturizing shears” and began creating layers upon layers of hair and removing excess bulk in the client’s hair. After she got all of the texturizing done, she moved on to the bangs. She styled this part of the hair but using a razor and running it through the ends of the bangs to take off split ends and excess bulk, once again.

I, of course, have heard of texturizing shears and a razor but I had never seen them in action, so I had never known the performance they gave. I was truly amazed by these two tools and all they had to offer. If you were in the same position as me and have never really had anything done to your hair other than a trim every time you visit your stylist, it’s time to get rid of the boring cuts. Next time you get a haircut, make it a cut, not just a trim, by asking your stylist to use her texturizing shears and razor to help blend some new layers and make your hair healthier and lighter on your shoulders.

Like Mother – Like Daughter: Teach your kids about quality hair tools

October 24, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

They watch everything you do and imitate you, so it shouldn’t be a surprise when your children start asking you about using their own hair styling tools. The question is, what should you let them use? And when are they old enough to use hair styling tools themselves?

 

The answer to this question will vary dramatically depending on your child and their interests of course. But a general rule of thumb is to slowly introduce your child to your own styling tools when they start showing interest. You know your child best, so you should be able to gauge how responsible they are and what you should let them use.

 

A good tool to start with is the hair dryer. Because it’s fairly simple to use, even children as young as six or seven can begin using a hair dryer if they use it under supervision. It’s not likely that they will burn themselves using a hair dryer, however you should still use caution and be sure that you explain to your daughter the safety rules and things that they should be aware of. Be sure that she keeps the dryer a safe distance from her hair and uses it on a low setting.

 

As your daughter gets older and begins to take more of an interest in her own personal style, she may want to use a curling iron or hair straightener on her own. Generally when children are around ten or eleven, they should be responsible enough to handle these tools safely. Again, it’s essential that you explain to your daughter the important safety considerations. Things like turning off the tool when she’s done with it, keeping it away from any other items on the counter, being careful not to touch the surface area and keeping the tool away from water.

 

It’s usually a good idea to take your daughter to the hairstylist and have her explain to your child how to properly use the hair tool to create the style that they are looking for. This will give your daughter the chance to learn directly from the expert what she needs to do which will avoid frustration later on.

 

You may be tempted to buy your daughter a cheaper curling iron or straightening iron instead of a higher quality one. You may reason that she doesn’t need a high quality one because she’s just learning how to use it. However, think of it this way. If you purchase a high quality and more expensive tool for her in the first place – she will see better results right away, because the higher quality hair tools work much more effectively. Also, you will be helping her protect her hair because higher quality tools will cause much less damage to the hair, and in many cases enhance the health of the hair.

 

There is no point in starting her with low quality hair tools that are only going to damage and burn her hair. She’ll simply get frustrated and not be able to achieve the results that she needs with her hair. Start her out with quality hair tools and give her the education that she needs in order to achieve the beautiful hair styles that she desires.

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