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Different altitudes and your hair

June 28, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Something that I have noticed every time I travel is the change in my hair and skin. I am not talking about some far away place you need to take a plane to. I mean maybe just a 4 hour drive! I would be thinking I look pleasing to the eye only to have 2 days after arriving both my skin and hair look awful. This happens because of change of altitude and different types of water. For athletes and mountain climbers changing altitudes causes extreme stress so how could it possibly not affect your skin and hair?

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Take note that there is nothing you can do about this change, it can take up to 2 weeks but normally 1-3 days for your body to climatize. Even if you move somewhere your body and its changes are only temporary.  Other than hair and skin there are more changes that occur, within your whole body.   Some people get very sick, facial sweating, and nauseated for days only to mention a few of them.

You can, however try a herbal supplement, I found a site that carries one. It is supposed to help bring blood and energy to the lungs and has been shown to minimize and in some cases eliminate negative affects on the body. This site is bearbrandosha.com, hopefully this will help those of you planning to go somewhere this summer or making a move. Remember though your air hand skin are the least of your concerns, altitude will affect every person everywhere in worse ways than your skin and hair. You can find out more about this by googling “Affects on the body with change in altitude” Till next time Good Luck,

Niki

How do I know if I am using a Hair Straightener Right?

June 25, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Using a hair straightener varies from hair type to hair type. If you have the kind of hair that no matter what you do it always looks healthy and shiny then go ahead, straighten, perm, color, it simply wont matter….YOU ARE LUCKY! If you have thin fine hair, never ever use a hair iron on full temperature, or any other heating product for that matter, you will burn your hair. Also, never use any kind of heating element on your hair until it is fully dry. Your hair will melt, and you will see smoke coming up from the iron.

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From my findings, only very VERY thick course hair, “ethnic” hair, or that exquisite type of hair where it just doesn’t matter what they do, can use the highest temperature. Also, with this type of hair a hair straightener can be used on damp hair. ( Some reviews I have read will state that this is the only way to, in the long run, straighten their hair)

It is simply trial and error, but there is one strain of hair that absolutely, positively, cannot endure the risks of too much heat or having your hair still damp during hot iron use. That is thin….fine….hair!. It’s sad, I know, but fine thin hair is always the one you have to be wary of, well there are the “over permed, colored, frizzy types of hair also! They too have to be careful and use low settings and have their hair completely dry before attacking it with the heat. Excessive blow drying along with the use of any heating product is going to cause damage. Always start small and climb! Better to have used the lowest setting and not have to toss that burnt chunk of hair in your trash bin! burnt-hair.jpg

Till next time Good Luck,

Niki

Something Every Parent Should Know about Allergic Reactions and Hair!

June 24, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Although I have a son and hopefully he will not be asking anytime soon whether or not he can “borrow mom’s hair straightener” I am sure that there are many moms who hear that from their young daughter. Now this is personally my opinion and I am not here to tell you what to do but I will prove my point with some actual events in this post later. I think a child’s hair is the most virgin type hair you can get. I see young girls getting their hair permed and colored even hair extensions, this is too much for a young girl…I think!

Now, why wreck such “virgin” hair? I do understand some people’s hair you can take through the ringer and still see no damage, but I think that children require an age limit where it is okay to do what they please with their hair. Colouring, perms and hair extensions not being among them…for me. Now, on the other hand, considering the Karmin hair straightener has temperatures that allow the user control of the heat to distribute, I do not see any harm, I do recommend the adult be there to either assist or do the work. I would use the lowest temperature to start with and see if this work’s for your daughter’s hair.

Now here is what I found “Googling”. There was a young girl of 14 who wanted to color her hair, she had never before done so and didn’t “think” she needed her parents supervision. Well, what incurred was a severe allergic reaction to the color and this poor girl ended up in agony with major weeping sores all over her head and a swollen face for over 10 days. hair-dye-swollen.jpg

Another girl of 13, was rushed to hospital after using a L’oreal cream hair color, she too had an allergic reaction. Her face was swollen for days also, given no photo judging by the one above I am sure it wasn’t any prettier.

And still another girl writes: After dyeing my hair I had an allergic reaction. I hadn’t done a patch test cause I figured I would be safe, I wasn’t. I ended up with second degree burns all over my scalp, neck, and ears. That was several months ago and the color has now grown out quite a bit, but my scalp has not felt the same since.

Something that should always be done is a patch test, whether or not you are coloring or getting some kind of permanent wave. Always do this at the back bottom of your head so you will not see this section if a reaction occurs and you cannot finish the rest of your hair.

Surprisingly enough still yet another girl wrote that she was “surprised” to have a reaction. “I looked like the elephant man all the way down to my chin,” “burns on the scalp as well.” I used nothing on my hair for almost 2 years after this happened.

I really could have gone on for quite some time in regards to this topic but I don’t think anyone after seeing the above photo would want to see another child in such agonizing pain. Do I need to mention patch testing again? Parents, you are required to be there, not only to inform your child of the possibility of a horrendous outcome but to let them know that yes, this can happen, even to them. I feel for these poor girls, that had to be painful, and yes, I do realize that we cannot be there all of the time but if given the chance I would show these photos to my young daughter to deter this from ever happening. Till next time, Good Luck,

niki

The Creation of Hair Straighteners

June 23, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Hair straighteners work by breaking down the hair’s hydrogen bonds found in the hair’s cortex, which cause hair to bend and become curly. Once the bonds are broken, hair is prevented from holding its original, natural form, though the hydrogen bonds can re-form if exposed to moisture.

hairstraighten-curly.jpgA females hair before and after straightening.
The hair straightener some say dates back to 1872 to a Parisian gentleman called Marcel Grateau. His early invention which were basically heat rods, were used with chemical lotions and then added to the hair to straighten it. When these methods were used there were many draw backs. People would find their hair becoming damaged and in most cases burnt. The first patented hair iron was in 1906 by Simon Monroe, he created a tool that had metal teeth and then would be combed through the hair. They seemed to work but nothing like what we have today.

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This is the actual patent from Simon Monroe, whereas to show the whole document would have taken too much space.

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This is Simon Monroe’s drawn picture of the hot combs. He filed for the patent in 1903 and it was issued in 1906.

The first “real” hair straightener design would have to be in 1909 by Issac Shero, he patented and invented the first heated hair care tools.

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This was the actual patent and plans for Issac Shero’s Hair Straightener.

The first designs were hot metal plates that were used to slide through the hair, the products were a great improvement on the early day inventions and reduced risk on damaging the hair. He then advanced his designs and introduced ones which included the ceramic straightener and electrical straighteners. He was also the first person to have adjustable heat settings and different size hair straighteners. The most common hair straightener today would be the ceramic ones with the heating elements. It was proven by the early models that using straighteners can be damaging for the hair if not used properly or too much, this still applies today and the chances of getting split ends, or brittle and broken hair is increased. Unlike in the early days there has been advancement in many of the hairstyling tools to prevent this from happening. Products such as heat protection sprays and conditioning creams will reduce the amount of damage caused by excessive use.

So you have pretty much read a lot of “inventions” in our hair blogs lately. If there is one you would like to know about feel free to let us know. Till next time, Good Luck,

Niki

Who Invented the Curling Iron?

June 17, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

So who invented the curling iron? You will find many references to “invented” and “patented by” or “introduced by”. The original inventor is lost in the mists of time but this much I have found out…

In 1866, Hiram Maxim applied for and obtained the first of many patents at age 26 for a hair curling iron. He also has a machine gun bearing his name.

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Hiram Maxim 1840-1916.

Four years later, two Frenchmen, Maurice Lentheric and Marcel Grateau, used hot-air drying and heated curling tongs to make long-lasting Marcel waves. Twenty years later, Alexandre F. Godefroy, a French hairdresser, invented the hair dryer, composed of a bonnet attached to a flexible chimney that extended to a gas stove.

In 1905, Sarah Breedlove Walker created a cosmetic industry in Indianapolis, Indiana. She became the first African-American female millionaire in America after inventing a method for straightening hair using emollient creams and hot combs. In 1906, Charles L. Nessler, a German hairdresser working in London, applied a borax paste and curled hair with an iron to make the first permanent waves. This expensive process took a long twelve hours. Eight years later, Eugene Sutter adapted the method by designing a dryer that contained twenty heaters to do the job of waving more efficiently. Following Sutter was Gaston Boudou, who modified Sutter’s dryer and invented an automatic roller. By 1920, Rambaud, a Paris beautician, had perfected a system of curling and drying permed hair for softer, looser curls by using an electric hot-air dryer, an innovation of the period made by the Racine Universal Motor Company of Racine, Wisconsin.

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This antique electric curling iron has wooden handles and was made to plug into a light socket.

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This is an antique curling iron and crimper thought to be early 20th Century.

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Antique Victorian curling iron.

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This is a hair curling iron with a beaded silver handle. It was made by Mulholland Bros. Inc. in Aurora IL. active between 1915-1932.

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These irons were generally heated over a kerosene lamp then rolling a small tuft of hair in it to set the hair.

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The red one is made by Duro and has a push button to turn it on, neither the black or brown one has a name.

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Early Hair tongs.

Till next time Good Luck,

Niki

History of Hair Extensions

June 16, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Believe it or not but hair extensions go as far back as the Egyptian days. They were worn by both genders for cosmetic adornment. In addition to cosmetic vanity, wigs served another purpose as well, to avoid infection of head lice. Egyptian men shaved their head but wore wigs to protect them from the different elements.

Fake hair for women became frowned upon after 1800 and women wore hair more naturally. In the early 20th Century Edwardian women wore false hair additions to create the pompadour hairstyle, shown below.

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Fake hair returned once again with the elaborate “Appollo Knots” of the Romantic era, shown below.

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Later human hair additions were used so extensively in the mid Victorian era that 51,816 kgs of fake human hair were sold in France in 1871 and 102,900 kgs in 1873.

By the 1920′s less hair rather than more was considered “in”. In the 1940′s long natural hair like that of Lauren Bacall was one of the few remaining luxuries a woman could indulge in.

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Lauren Bacall

Many eons later Asian countries learned to process and manufacture hair extensions to be sold all over the world. Like now most of the wigs and hair extensions were made of human hair, the main difference was the way they were worn by each individual. Wigs were coated ith beeswax or plant resin to adhere to the scalp. Now, we have fusion techniques, clip on hair extensions and strand bond weaving, back in the day, they were fastened with a thread to the wearer’s natural hair.

Extensions were worn mostly by the very wealthy who could afford the cost and sit still for about 12 to 15 hours . Others followed when they saw what was possible when hair extensions were applied in a glamorous way. In particular black women used hair extensions to improve upon hair texture that some found difficult to tame. It became common to see pop singers sport a wide range of looks that centred around hair extensions.

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So you see we have come a very very long way with what we can do with actual human hair. It’s quite amazing knowing that the Ancient Egyptians were doing it long before we even knew what they were. Till next time Good Luck,

Niki

Remi Hair Extensions

June 15, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

 

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Believe it or not these are Hair extensions! They are called Remi Hair Extensions. Remi Hair Extensions begin with selecting the best raw materials. Each strand is hand picked strand by strand to ensure the cuticle layers are aligned in the same direction so that no tangling occurs. Remi hair is hand processed virgin hair and have the longest life and are of excellent quality. Simply the best hair extensions you can buy. We will be selling these as well as other types of hair extensions that I will mention in later blogs. So keep your eyes open for your chance to grab the greatest of all Hair Extensions….”Remi” Below are all photos of Remi Hair Extensions.

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Till Next time Good Luck,

niki

WIN A FREE KARMIN TITANIUM HAIR STRAIGHTENER!

June 13, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Well, we decided to do it again! However, this time, we have chosen to give away 10 Karmin Hair Straightening Irons!

Here’s how it works -

Become a fan of My Hair Styling Tools by August 13th 2008 Midnight and you will be entered to win. Simple as that!

We will randomly draw 10 names on August 13th from the entire list of fans and they will win a Free Karmin Titanium Hair Iron, shipping included! No catch, no cost, no small print! You will need to have a Facebook account, if you do not, you can sign up on the Facebook Main Page.

Winners will be notified through Facebook.

Good Luck!

Erin Kelly
www.myhairstylingtools.com
Professional Hair Tools

Hair Straightener Survey

June 13, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

For all you ladies, and gentlemen, who use a hair straightener, we want YOUR opinion! When it comes to hair straighteners, there is a huge selection on the market and they all have different features making finding the best one a little difficult.

Well, thats why we decided to put together a survey to find out what YOU want from your professional  hair straightener! With everything from price to the products you would like to see included with your flat iron, this quick 6 question survey will help us provide you, our customer, with exactly what you want!

So please, take a few minutes and tell us what you want by completing our Hair Straightener Survey.

Thanks!

Erin Kelly
www.myhairstylingtools.com

Fusion Hair Extensions

June 13, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Fusion hair extensions is a method used to place hair extensions in hair. There are different ways of fusing the hair, each method can offer different advantages and disadvantages.

Hair extensions can be attached to your head in many different ways, including gluing, tubing, sewing, and clipping on. Different methods have different advantages. The method you choose will depend on many factors: your hair, your lifestyle, your budget, and your needs, for starters. If you are looking for a long-lasting, natural-looking hair extension, though, consider one of the fusion methods.

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Hot fusion iron.

Fusion hair extensions can be applied in two different ways. Hot fusion and cold fusion. The application of the hot fusion has its advantages and disadvantages. Hot fusion can usually allow the hair extensions to last up to 4 months.

Cold fusion is a new method that is gentler on your hair. As this method uses no heat, it is good for fine or thin hair. The polymer offers more flexibility than hot-glue, and results in a more natural-feeling of the hair extensions. For cold fusion hair extensions, many hairdressers use SoCap extensions and a clear bond. These extensions can last up to six months.

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fusion hair extensions

So keep your eyes open once again as we will soon be adding fusion hair extensions to our collection of items for sale. Till next time Good Luck,

niki

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